About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
CSPAN2 99
LANGUAGE
English 99
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
, former chairman of the energy and commerce committee and currently the co-chair of the congressional privacy caucus. representative barton command a few days and then the lame-duck sessions of the 112 congress, do you foresee any action on the issues of privacy? >> being handled? >> i've asked the chairman of the commerce committee to consider moving the do not track kids online privacy bill the congressman markey and i have introduced. i don't have a commitment from him to do that, but that bill is a possible, especially in the lame-duck. in the regular session we are probably not bring to have that more legislative days. succumb if we have one bill, though that would -- that is the one that i've asked the chairman to consider. >> would you like to see more comprehensive legislation? >> i would. i think the public is ahead of the congress of privacy and companies like microsoft building in their default positions to have more and more privacy, but in the congress we are still behind the curve. we have gained a lot of ground in the congress and our privacy caucus in the house the co-
texas, former chairman of the energy and commerce committee and currently co-chair of the congressional privacy caucus. representative barton, in the few days and then lame duck session of the 112th congress, do you foresee any actions on the issues of privacy being handled? >> guest: i have asked chairman upton of the energy and commerce committee to consider moving the do not track kids online privacy bill that congressman markey and i have introduced. i don't have a commitment for him to do that, but that bill is a possible, especially in the lame duck. in the regular session, we're probably not going to have that many more legislative days. so if we had one bill, though, that would -- that's the one i've asked the chairman to consider moving. >> host: would you like to see more comprehensive privacy legislation considered and passed by congress? >> guest: i would. i think the public is ahead of the congress on privacy, and i think, you know, companies like microsoft and some of of those guys are ahead. i mean, they're building in their default positions. they have more and more priv
congress whacks the power under the commerce power or necessary and proper power to impose a mandate to purchase insurance. of course it says the statute was valid under the taxing power but only did that by read characterizing the statute as not a mandate to purchase insurance but as a tax on the status of not having insurance so construed they upheld it as a valid exercise of taxing power. it is worth recognizing that that is a different statute from the statute congress passed and it has different practical effects. most law-abiding citizens if told there is a constitutionally valid mandate to purchase insurance will purchase insurance. i think most people if told that they have to pay a tax if they don't purchase insurance will want to know how much is the tax and how much does the insurance cost and they will make a rational decision whether to purchase health insurance and some people will purchase insurance and some people will choose to pay the tax. the practical consequence i believe is that the number of individuals who will remain uninsured will be higher under a regime th
was the chairman of the commerce manufacturing trade subcommittee for the energy and commerce committee and representative coming you just held a hearing recently on apps. what was the point of the hearing? >> to make sure that we explore what is going on in this area and there are so many jobs being created and we want to make sure any policies we put forward in washington don't squash the ballooning industry. ten years ago, 15 years ago, nobody thought of this. it's a relatively new industry that has been unleashed because of great ideas and we certainly don't want the government to come and destroy that. >> what were some of the problems that you saw in this area that he would like to address? >> one of the biggest problems is the work force. they are still looking for more people to move into this industry to develop that and work on creating the applications and all that goes into. that's the biggest problem that fewer people have that somehow in washington we are going to decide your way to tell liver but how to do their business or how not to do their business and hurt a growing
.org. >>> next on book tv, ro khana secretary of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for that kind introduction. it is an honor to be at politics and prose, such an institution to the city and really a pleasure to be here. thank you for everyone coming out on this august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments, and i rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective so that we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to become competitive. the idea for the book came about when i was traveling around the country. i would go and see a successful manufacturer making lenders, making steel, making fire suits making meat and food, and i would say you know, i thought all of our manufacturing had gone offshore. something doesn't make sense. and so i started to wonder what were people missing in the story if. and it turns out that one allele of consumer manufacturing has gone offshore so if you go into a store, but
of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. >> thank you for the kind introduction. it is an honor to be yet politics and prose, such an institution to the city and a pleasure to be here. thank you everyone for coming on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments and i would rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective so we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to be competitive. the idea from the book came about when i was traveling and around the country, and i would see a successful manufacturer making blunders and steel and full-year suits and meat and food, and i would say i thought that all of our manufacturing had gone offshore. something didn't make sense. so i started to wonder what were people missing in the story? and it turns out that while a lot of manufacturing has gone offshore, so if you go into a store, the toys and apparel and all of that we still are a world leader when it comes to complex and advanced man
on the commerce clause. everyone of the justices at some level will see the commerce power is fairly broad. i also think all nine justices recognize there have to be limits on the commerce power, otherwise the whole point of enumerating the various powers of congress was entirely beside the point. they could instead the commerce power, were down. now i think some of the justices may question what role there is for the judiciary to enforce the commerce power letters. what happened in this case is that five justices did adopt what is bad at least the dominant view since the lopez decision, which is the core can simply knock it out of enforcing limits on federalism on the power of the federal government to adhere to iowa quote justice kennedy from his lopez concurrence. as he said then, the federal balance is too essential a part of archons additional structure in place to vital ebola in securing freedom for us to admit an inability to intervene when one or the other level of government has tipped the scales too far. i think he also recognize this is not an area where there are strong occasional ince
>> next and booktv ro khanna legal assistant deputy -- dubya secretary of commerce argues the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in at manufacturing and innovation. it is about 45 minutes. >> thank you. thank you for the very kind introduction. a real honor to be at politics and prose. such an institution to the city and the pleasure to be here. thank you for coming out on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments and i have more of an exchange of ideas and your perspective so i can have a conversation about manufacturing and what the country should do to be competitive. the idea for the book came about when i was traveling around the country and i would see a successful manufacturer making lenders, making steel, making meat and food and i would say i thought our manufacturing had gone off shore. something didn't make sense. i started to wonder what were people missing in the story and it turns out that while a lot of consumer manufacturing has gone off shore or if you go into a store, the toys and apparel, a lot of that has left america, we are s
dealt with the commerce clause issue yes, five of them including john roberts said it exceeds the bet exceeds the power because it is so unusual. in other words they didn't cast down a month to meet the among the president's. they gave congress the power under the understanding of the commerce clause so there is a sense in which it me be one of to the of the calls could be more important but we just don't know. we will have to see. so, my time is up and i am really sorry that i had to do my signing before because i had to catch a plane so i won't see you at the signing table but thank you very much for coming. [applause] said that even a part of the 2011 national book festival here in washington, d.c.. to find out more, visit loc.gov/bookfest. jeffrey to the reports on the relationship which in the obama administration and the u.s. supreme court. the author exam of the recent addition of the four justices in the past five years and how it has affected the court's decisions on the numerous cases including its recent ruling on health care. it's about an hour. [applause] thank you. hello
without the koreans. it is been a beautiful thing to see. and i am intrigued at how commerce brings people together. a very beautiful way without central planning. i can tell you, koreans have nothing in common. culturally in any other way. we love each other. it's a beautiful thing to see how, sprays people together. beautiful. >> what is? >> founded in 1972 back in the analog age when people just read paper and ink and got their work to the milk. you don't remember these days. i vaguely. and it was very prosperous. it was a kind of us source for libertarian ideas back in the old days. bump up against the digital age, 1995. it began to have problems and never became profitable again. in 2010, the way you acquire an old mansion that was falling down something. help of refurbishing it. very honored to be picked to become executive editor and hope that i could turn a profit. >> what kind of books he published? >> leslie history and philosophy and economics and financial books. and we're doing more publishing now. this is how i started in november. back now, it's everywhere. never were you gu
is representative mary bono mack who is the chairman of the commerce, manufacturing and trade subcommittee for energy and commerce committee, and, representative bono mack, you just held a hearing recently on apps. what was the point of your hearing? >> guest: well, the point was to make sure we explore what's going well in this area. there are so many jobs that are being created there, we want to make sure any policies we put forward in washington don't squash a blooming industry, a blooming, you know, ten years ago, fifteen years ago, nobody thought of this. it's a relatively new industry that has been unleashed because of great ideas, and we certainly don't want the government to come in and i do that. >> host: and what were some of the problems that you saw in this area that you'd like to address? >> guest: you know, one of the biggest problems is the work force, that they're still looking for more and more people to move into this industry to develop apps, to work on creating apps, all that goes into it. basically, that's the biggest problem, i think, the fears people have, of course,
am intrigued help commerce brains people together a bout central planning. coulter lake three hands have nothing in common but the brotherhood of man is beautiful. >> host: what is laissez-faire books? >> founded back in the analog age can you imagine? i vaguely remember these days it was the economists source for libertarian ideas in 1995 they began to have problems and never became profitable again was like acquiring the old so i was very honored to be picked for the executive better in the hope to turn it around we publish history and philosophy and we're doing more publishing now. is everywhere. and i started a digital ballclub just like the old fashioned book club only in the digital world. [laughter] in has only been around six weeks but it is of a wonderful thing to be part of a commercial endeavor. you make a plan that it can change i don't know all the answers but maybe there will present themselves. it is a creative endeavor. it is from the balance it is beautiful see you could go to bet at night i did the right thing that i will try again tomorrow. >> what is the ludwig v
under the commerce power, whether it is justified under the necessary and proper power of the constitution, and whether or not it can be justified under the taxing power. it's worth focusing on the fact these are three issues and they needed to prevail on one. these are three separate issues where y they had the tower pass the statute. and so -- if you think back to the statement there was only a 1% chance of prevailing, part of the challenge for those attacking the statute was they really did have to run the table on the arguments. and to make matters even more difficult, i think it was conventional wisdom and a part of conventional wisdom that didn't turn out to be wrong, there were four votes on the court ready to uphold the law on any one of these grounds. and so what that meant in practical terms is that in order to prevail, the challengers really needed to run the table and on the three issues get 15 out of 15 available votes. now the god news is that the challengers managed quite remarkable feet of getting 14 out of 15 votes. [laughter] bad news, of course, the 1
they might get busted for their garden. now they have the chamber of commerce and a sheriff's permit -- they have bracelets and necklaces of one all their plans. it was an unmitigated success. now, you will notice this slightly sad story. visit to a program works. heading into the mendocino county area, i am a renter myself. i haven't had have the hat and the broken down truck and the beard and i am an organic hemp proponent, we buy only organic hemp diapers. for sale out here in the lobby. we tie our tomato plants with hemp twine because it holds of the best. but we have to get -- it's growing 20% per year. hemp is such a good fiber, it is in the dodge viper numbers and doors. i couldn't believe it. i called and they said yes, we do use cannabis. this is not squeezing the oil from that permits a perfect oil. what i want is a solution to this. i want to see if i'm getting this right. one of the directors here and one of the founders to get navy or army surplus have, a deal something in the 70s? smacked it was a coalition. we specialize in clothing and help develop it. it was romanian
, and some of these things such as the chamber of commerce boosters and some of it was about land planning. some of it was about race and poverty. but it was a conversation that americans were starting to have as they could see the signals that things were not going quite right for america. this was the 1970s. the energy crisis staring us in the face. and this is not just among the grassroots there were big businesspeople. i have quotes in the book saying you know this is commonsense. we need to plan our future. when reagan was elected, rip the solar panels out of the white house and more importantly, photoshop the future out of our future. it was not -- the future was not going to be shaped by government. it was going to be determined by the market. and that mindset you know has been reinforced in the echo chamber of our politics. so people are confused about that, but they also don't understand or understand is the wrong word. they also don't see the importance of working together collectively. you see when the show whole show is the country is going to hell but i'm going to be okay it t
of this system to get health insurance to people. certainly part of interstate commerce. i think everyone had a very strong view that we were on very solid grounds, there was no question that the constitution was in our favorite, and that o ultimate the law would be indicated. i think the competence level, early when we are fighting in district court and appellate courts was enormously high. >> paul, it's like one of the stories you get to hear it from the other side. you were consulting with people during the act, i suppose, who were saying i wonder if there's any constitutional hook here. how did those discussions pick up momentum, when did you think we could win this thing? >> so let me start with two disclaimers. one is that i don't really know anything about health care policies. unlike the other people on the panel. and i think there's a misconception that if an appellate lawyer argues a case, he knows what he's talking about -- [laughter] or knows the junders lying policy -- underlining policy, i'm here to tell you that's not true. one of the reasons i love appellate law, it's a perfec
. what we're trying to do is increase commerce between the united states and other countries. what we're doing is debunk myths about the united states. so a lot of the not about politics per se. in term who we are reaching. there are over 5 billion mobile hand sets on planet earth. the average mobile penetration in developed country is about 116%. in developing countries, t about 70 or 0eu%. most of the people are using the hand sets to access social media platforms the state department publishes. we're reaching frankly large numbers of individuals the world around. there are about 2.4 the number is going to be three billion in the near future. what's also interesting to us is think about this from a development perspective and thinking about how, for example, sub-saharan africa or south-central asia are becoming connected how can the development programs can be more effective. how can we increase the health and well being. going above and beyond just traditional communication. glis you talk about gyre carats around the world and how you see their -- not all of them. exactly. we wante
wrote that he was going to be a chamber of commerce day, flies buzzed lazily of the gumbo and green and blue spring. i can hear the rhythmic of a few cicadas the first of the year coming up from the riverside. that's the rio grande. the wish of cars and trucks up and down the highway, the distant adding of locals taking target practice in the blm highway. we are surrounded and millions of acres of public land that once belonged to the ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly, go to that little punta of yours. the shriek usually happens in the final word of a phrase like life, taking the and bending at several different directions before her breath runs out amid she coughs. she coughs a lot. i hear it early in the morning, late at night. i hear very clearly when she's sitting on the patio smoking a joint. it is big and sharp, tissue creating deep inside her chest. every once in a while he was on, but he never shouts as lovely as she does. look at you, you're seko. they are dealing. we've noticed the traffic. perhaps a dozen cars at a drive-through. these customers are men, all this sp
valley. the local weather forecast growth that was going to be a chamber of commerce to. flies in the yellow green for spring. i can hear the rhythmic whir of a few cicadas. first of the year coming up from the riverside. that's the reason joe grand. the car sentra up-and-down taking target this across the highway. we are surrounded by millions of acres of land that once belonged to the ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly, her voice builds encrusting shriek, which usually happens on the final word of the phrase like life, taken the vow and bending at several different directions before her breath rundown, then she coughs. she coughs a lot. as your early in the morning, late at night. you're clearly when she's sitting on the patio smoking a joint. the throat clenching and tissue creating deep inside her chest. everyone's been a while, he responds, but he never shows as loudly as she does. look at you, you're psycho. they are dealing. we have noticed the traffic. perhaps a dozen cars a day trip through. these customers are men, i'll expand on his as mexican-americans can't th
else going on.. everybody talked out the hurricane still and the chamber of commerce.er f you learn more spending a day n and taking the tour and you seee all of this residue which remains. if you spend a lot of time onhe the ground and learn much from r being there if galveston is unusual or unique, then theane. impact is this an francisco with the earthquake or even southlseg florida. miss degette was not a defining event because so much also stolen. he was eclipsed and destroyed soan much of the city there bysped beating houston to the north this competition. i spent a fair amount of time.r i looked down at least six times g lot of research in the library there. who has been to galveston? on event to galveston expecting something like charleston. li t what i was surprised that isuse when you go there in the heart c of the city today you can't get september 8th because somethinga fundamental changed. after the storm city built the daise sea level and then elevated thed entire city anywhere from 8 feet to 2 feet and raised thes mis cathedral if you can imaginetild that the whole ci
and if these incentives that could be changed to incentivize? >> absolutely. but think a lot of the department of commerce help small and medium-sized businesses. 50% of their jobs to train our small come and medium-sized companies and small have an advantage because they are doing things. they can afford automation, making products rooted in their communities. and the reason i'm so passionate to some of these attacks on commerce is because some people say, well, we can just eliminate all of that. this subsidy, government assistance. well, the people who need the governments help in a world where their countries are subsidizing multinational corporations at the small and medium-sized businesses. there are a number of programs that help and are designed to help small and medium-sized program, an extension partnership, the export promotion agencies, a number of others that i describe in the book. i think sending men and coming to a bipartisan is that we need to work with some of them can be the one step in offsetting the disadvantage they are under competing with large companies. >> hi. in the absence of bi
never was although he gave his vote on the commerce clause to the other for conservatives, but i always thought he would be the decider. this would indicate that he's kind of changing his tune of attacking more to the metal. this term will tell because unlike the health care case, this coming term that has affirmative action and almost certainly voting rights took the big great subjects and rate has been his subject just like federalism was kennedy. roberts is entering his eighth term as the chief justice, so, early in his tenure in the case in 2007 where he said the way to stop discriminating by race is to stop discriminating by race he says as in validating an effort by the systems to keep public schools from resegregate in. he's eager to get into the subjects. what i expect attacking to the metal on those i don't think so but i'm not 100% sure it is the question of the moment. this is where the roberts court is about to meet the road there is a decision to be made between what a judge believes, and he deeply believes it is wrong for the government to classify or count people by race
of the decisions of the hughes court -- whether congress has exceeded its power to regulate interstate commerce. so whether it could be regulations that went across state lines, very broad regulations. well, that will be one of the arguments in the health care bill that comes up for argument next month. the question is whether congress has exceeded his authority under the commerce clause. most of the cuts towards congress, that is, i think most of the president, certainly in the late 1930s, some of which chief justice hughes wrote, he gave congress more leeway to regulate interstate commerce. that became pretty much the modern commerce clause doctrine for the next six years. but we don't know about the score. this is a very polarized court and presidents goes the other way. also. this will be very interesting to see that. to see what happens. thank you very much. [applause] [applause] >> your government and mine and it can be what these governments wanted to be. sometimes we talk about the u.n. as though it is a distance by doing that, we get the governments involved that are actually responsible i
affect the interstate commerce coming and for period of time, they even argued that this would cover all such land that could be the habitat for migratory birds. something that is commonly referred to as the goose test. what is interesting about the regulations that the epa enforced is that we know they cannot be enforced as written. the regulation as it is promulgated purport to reach what could affect the interstate commerce. we know in the united states versus lopez in 1995 the court decision since the commerce clause doesn't reach the mere potential on the commerce. there must be a substantial effect on the interstate commerce. the existing regulations don't require the substantial effect in fact they don't even require the actual effect. by their terms they only require a potential effect. they reach far beyond the scope of the federal commerce clause authority. the supreme court has twice been asked to consider the application of the regulations to the private land owners once in the case called swank. they did it merely to keep it in the constitutional bounds and in each case they
in the past because they were afraid that they might get busted for their garden. nokia chamber of commerce, have a sheriffs permit, they have bracelets and necklaces on all their plants. it was an unmitigated success. you will notice past tense, andrew get into slightly unhelpfully -- by zip-tie program work. heading into mendocino county, it's quite possible that it didn't so much become native -- i'm a rancher of myself but not cannabis ranch. i make good rant you. i have a broken down truck, i have the beard and i fit right in. hemp and cannabis were already in my families like the only organic hemp, diapers. the soap for sale out here in the lobby. we tie our tomato plants with hemp twine because it holds up the best. we have to get from roaming. the hemp market is growing. it's in the dodge viper romper and was but i couldn't believe it. i call to pick up they said that, we used cannabis in the dodge viper because it works and it's good. what i really want to see is fill 'er up with hemp. this is not using hemp seed oil. i added to my family shake everyone. non-psychoactive. it's not
of these things were just chamber of commerce boosters. some of it was above land planning. silva was about race and poverty , but it was a conversation that americans are starting to have as they can see the signals that things were not going quite right. this is the 1970's. energy crisis. staring us in the face. and this is not just among the grass roots left. big business people. this is just common sense. many to plan our future. when reagan was elected, the solar panels ripped of the white house. more importantly, photo showed the future out of -- was not going to be -- the future was not calling to be shipped by government, it was going to be determined by the market. that mind-set has been reinforced in reinforced in the echo chamber of our politics. so people are confused about that. they also don't understand. the doe and as -- they also don't see the importance of working together collectively. see, when the polls show was that the country is going to hell, but i'm going to be okay it tells you there's a disconnect. the connection was made by the new deal between the future, the collec
night the local weather forecaster wrote to it would be a chamber of commerce day and i could hear the cicadas coming up from the riverside those states gain target practice and we're surrounded by millions of acres of publicly and that once belonged to ancestors of my neighbors. and suddenly heard oasis builds the ball bad then sit and several different directions. vichy will call off. all lot. i hear that night when she sits on the patio it is quick and sharp everyone's in awhile he responds but he never shouts adds law of the. look at you. you are psycho. they are dealing. we notice the traffic seven cars per day. the customers are men young and old mostly in the work truck some come early some to raise rates job but there's clearly after finishing work and some in the middle of the day. and it just so happens there prominent in the area. one member of the klan owns a nightclub i am told our old connected family. they passed on the advice of local law enforcement after she suspected he stole the lawn mower. >> we cannot do anything but if you want to take action issue to drag h
east, probably saved two million people from starvation, and was a very energetic secretary of commerce under harding and coolidge after this election. but in terms of personality, dower, pragmatic. you listen to -- one of the reasons why i think franklin roosevelt comes across like gangbusters, is impression with the fireside chats is the act he is following. after herbert hoover, anybody could have sounded good. >> host: moving on to be 1948. harry truman's improbable victory, published last year. you write: victory has a thousand fathers. defeat, in 1946, had one. harry truman. if he appeared ineffectual before election day that year he seemed outright repulsive after that. democrats faulted him and not the effect of 16 years of their rule for their debacle. they wanted him out and wanted him out now. >> guest: yes, they did. he was not -- we saw in this last presidential round of primaries, with the'mans, where everybody was saying i'm the next reagan, this guy -- no. there's not another reagan. and there wasn't another franklin roosevelt, and harry truman sure as hell to use his s
density and there's enough commerce, enough population, then in the early part of the 19th century they get going and they really take off in the 1830s. >> so that's when it's fair to say for the first time that journalism is a business? >> oh, yes. it's clear by then. >> now, as much as people make fun of us, so i have to ask -- >> more power to you. >> when did the notion of journalism as a professional come on the scene in? >> that is still contested terrain, in the since -- >> you and i both remember we're going into journalism, we are upset by college kids were going into journalism. >> yes, and you still here today once in a while, you know, if you find the right kind of a person, you can get a barroom stool argument going over the necessity of journalism instruction. in fact that apprentice model that you and i came across when we were starting out, has really been thrown overboard because no one, almost no one in the news business any longer can afford to have someone on the payroll just while the getting instructed and learning the ropes. so a lot of that training role of
is a chamber of commerce has attacked about my particular proposals. but i talk about here is how scott brown has already voted and also talking about what he said in his own voice last week he wanted to make crystal clear. and that is coming he would let taxes go up for 90% of families in order to protect tax breaks for the top 2%. >> withstand economic policy. it can come you can return to this topic since the debate wears on. bless you. this coming new years day may not be a happy one if nothing is done to steer us away from the so-called fiscal class, which includes mandatory budget cuts that could cost massachusetts close to 40,000 jobs in defense related industries alone. u2 have argued quite a bit over tax policy, including just now. i don't think anyone argues tax policy allowed will forestall the skies. correct me if i'm wrong. i'm sure you will. what other specific ideas you have for voting this economic care clinics >> obviously i collect tax to get in. we have expiring tax cuts in place for 12 years now. we also have sequestration. we have a lot of the debt ceiling coming up. just
's the same debate. you talk about the commerce clause. you talk about geek show protection and due process, substantive due process. it's all the same debate, and it is an appropriate debate. and it's one that i would wish what sort of tried to reach the same high level that we saw in philadelphia. and that we are going to see at other points in the ratification who writes like this sort of defenses and arguments that you see in the federalist? who sits at home and draft arguments and letters at you saw mason. he didn't have a staff drafting. these were people who were engaged in the constitution and i also wanted to know these were not scholars. these were not people that appropriated to themselves the sole licensed to interpret or to talk about this great document. these were farmers. these were businessmen. some of them who had formal education and some who did not. that they cared about this country and i think we still have it today. and you know i think that again, go back to your book. you talk about the written and the unwritten constitution. wealthy and written constitution is rea
, transnational crime and terrorism, enhancing commerce between nations and dealing with climate change. it requires courage and leadership to take the first step to a mutual understanding. i've been particularly impressed recently with juan manuel santos, the president of colombia, as he reaches out to two of his neighbors to restore diplomatic relations. .. against the people of cuba and that we display no interest in furthering or improving diplomatic relations. all us should continue to press the cuban government but the embargo undermines any credibility that my country has in calling for improvements in cuba. and i fear our democracy-aid program is aimed at regime change and does not promote democracy. unfortunately, the program is used by some in cuba to justify cuban-american gross who i know might believe to be innocent and keep him in prison. a more sincere diagnose should be held with -- the main reason that united states keeps cuba on the list is that because the et a have officers in cuba, but when i was last in havana, the columbian and the spanish told me that having them
.t.c. awed to be extended. -- ought to be extended: the u.s. chamber of commerce, national governors association, the governors wind energy coalition, american farm burea federation and many major national newspapers have all weighed in saying this is important to our country's future. members on both sides of the aisle, have i mentioned, have said the p.t.c. should be extended because they know and they've seen the positive effects of the p.t.c. on their communities and across the country. they also know that wind energy and renewable energy more generally is the future. it's the wave of the future. there's no question. all you have to do is look at the rest of the world. look at china, look at spain, look at denmark, look at developing countries. they're all investing in clean energy. it is not something they're doing to feel good. in sum extending the p.t.c. is a no-brainer. it's common sense. we need to do the job we were sent here to do. we ought to be extending the p.t.c. as soon as possible. it equals jobs. we ought to pass it as soon as possible. madam president, i'm going to
chamber of commerce. seven years ago we talked about transportation, and right outside this building there wasn't a rail to dulles being built. i was very proud to work on those with you in my time as governor. we talked about education. during my time as governor, we put in place the largest bond package to expand our higher ed institutions in the history of the commonwealth, and now there's significant construction at both george mason and the northern virginia community college campuses and expanded preconsidered -- prekindergarten. we landed marquee companies hilton, volkswagen of north america, northrup gum monday announced they were coming to the neighborhood. we also won accolades as the best state for business every year of my four years as governor. i'm proud of those accomplishments, i'm proud that we did them together. but i'm especially proud that we did 'em in the midst of the worst e are session -- recession since the 1930s. today we're here because we have a senate to be fixed. we've got to fix congress to end gridlock that's blocking progress to important goals. we ha
for the transportation, commerce, they recognize there's a fundamental part what it is to live in america in the 21st century. they wanted to goat bottom of it. many of the aerospace companies, they not only make the airplanes, they make the spaceships. and so we had air row people on the commission and space people on the commission. i was counted as one of the space people. one of the trips we took was around the world. this is late 2002. around the world to key places that have aerospace industries to find out is there some competition that we're not living up to? what are they doing we're not? we visited china. i went to bay shinning in 2002, my first time there, i went there with a complete portfolio of stereo types about what i would expect. boulevards of bicycles. this is what i expected. that's what was on the film loops that i saw growing up. arrive in beijing, there are bicycles, that's not filling the boulevard. there's her say mercedes and bmw. it's not like any picture i have seen. we meet with head captain of industry. heads of agencies there. i look carefully and see on the hand colleg
's 20 years ago. 20 years ago. last year, just last year the u.s. chamber of commerce, 20 years later, came out with another study. this is the u.s. chamber of commerce. this is not the social scientists. these are hardheaded business people. what did they say in the u.s. chamber of commerce report? we've got to put more money spew preschoo -- moremoney into pres. well, we at the federal level have been doing that through a program called head start, and we've had head start, i think if i'm not mistaken, since about 1968. high-quality early childhood education has been proven to save taxpayer dollars in the long run by reducing the costs for welfare, special education, and, might i add, criminal justice. read that -- jail time. one of the highest correlative -- in fact, if i'm not mistaken, the highest correlative factor for people who are incarcerated in our prisons is the lack of a high school education. urn the romney-ryan budget, up to 200,000 low-income children and their families could lose access to head start, again, in fiscal year 2014. i'm not talking about over the next ten
energy and commerce and come from the energy and commerce committee. he will talk about some of the matter is in front of that committee. >>> we want to welcome congressman joe barton, r-texas, member of the house energy and commerce committee. thanks for being with us. let me ask about some of the things congress will not accomplish. one is the farm bill. why such an inability to get a major piece of legislation through a republican controlled house? >> guest: it's republican house that a democratic senate. you've got to keep that in mind. i think the primary reason is that some of the more conservative republicans coming and certainly i consider myself to be a conservative republican want to take a look at the cost and not just a farm program that all of the programs, and so you have a disagreement if that is the right term about the spending levels. having said that, i think the majority of the house republicans would vote for the farm bill if it is put up on the floor and some amendments are made some of these issues could be worked out the regular order on the floor vote
to the commerce clause, the individual mandate and began litigation and filed from the government. and to the supreme court, after the decision in june this year i filed a motion to lift the stage to the eastern district of federal courts asking judge white to consider an amendment to the complaint and the original challenge about constitutionality of the law this is about implementation of the law. this addresses the concerns about the irs will adopt on the eighteenth specifically and the affordable care act's implementation since the employer mandate accessibility penalty under the law and our lawsuit is about that rule and the inconsistency with the statute and seeking to hold the federal government accountable since it relates to implementing that portion of the law. >> what about that part of the law? is it unconstitutional or illegal? what are you arguing? >> specifics include under the aca if a state does not adopt the health care exchange then the tax credits issued to the state consequently the employer mandate penalty does not accrue either. the irs on may 18th this year
and the internet became a platform for e commerce and services and 1985. after that we had a lot easier search for a permission and enabling more and more information communication technology innovation. in the coming years our governments embraced that i see tea dividend for the hope of the economic growth and productivity that it enabled and for the innovation agenda that it enabled. and we started to put more and more of our business services on to the backbone of the internet. today we have e-banking and e-commerce already in the internet. we are moving toward a future of having our energy distribution of a smart protected to the internet. we are moving to a generation of next generation aviation and air traffic control that is controlled by the internet and over the internet. and so we have moved so much of our essential services on to the internet than one has to ask, is that what it was designed for? is it's a cure for what we need a fork in the future? this brings about three tensions. i am going to try to stick to three. three tensions that we are seeing in the policy world and then t
to be for political purposes. a lot of what we're trying to do is increase commerce between the united states and other countries. part of what we're trying to do is debunk myths about the united states, increase tourism in the united states. so a lot of this is not all about politics per se. in terms of who we're reaching, you know, there are now over five billion mobile handsets on planet earth. the average mobile penetration in developed countries is now about 316% -- 116%, in developing countries it's about 70 or 80%. most of those people are using those handsets to access social media platforms where the state department publishes. so we're reaching large numbers of individuals the world around. there are about 2.4 sort of traditional internet users, and that number's going to be three billion in the near future, so, sure, we're communicating with all of -- with a great many of those. but what's also interesting to us is thinking about this great development perspective and thinking about how if, for example, sub-saharan africa or south central asia are becoming newly hyperconnected, how
budgets of the departments of commerce, education, energy, homeland security, interior, justice, state, plus the federal courts. so how is it that we're able to borrow so much money and pay so little interest on it? why aren't we like spain or italy or greece? if sorting out because we will manage our finances, or that we have a political system that seems to be a marvel of efficiency of compromise and comedy. it's because the rest of the world looks even worse. the united states is the world's tallest midget when it comes to borrowing money. if this could go on for ever, it would be fantastic. it is not going to go on forever. i have no clue when it's going to in but it's not going to go on forever. as interest rates return to normal, the share of the federal budget that goes to interest is going to rise. and that will crowd that spending on other things. it means they will pay taxes and will borrow money and some of the money would borrow will go to pay interest on the money we borrowed flashy. some of taxes we pay will go to pay interest to our creditors. and those creditors are inc
in 1783. once the cities get to be a certain density and there's enough commerce and population, then in the early part of the 19th century they get going and they really take off in 1830s. >> so that's when it's fair to say for the first time that journalism is a business? >> yes. it's clear by then. yeah. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org.
at it than there. you think of three kinds of broadly speaking, look at cyberattacks, free commerce. one is to try for you to try to take down networks, whether it's a communications network, for example, take down, shut down your to mutations, financial or something. the other two ways depend on the networks working. one is to use your communications networks to launch an attack against another network ideological grid. so use it as a point. and a third is to use it for content, and this is where the islamists have considerable confidence in radicalizing people over the internet with radical oriented islamic content. so we have an edge in the first two areas. we have the us and the israelis. most skilled people elsewhere on this, probably by governments behind russia and china are very good at that stuff. and that will come into any confrontation we have with them. content, they are more skilled at using than we are but we should certainly use whatever weapons we can. >> thank you, john. that's give john a hand. [applause] >> we would like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitt
was not like the department of commerce with people under him, but it was a small staff, and that was a good thing. he accumulated power through the friendships in congress with democrats and with republicans and i think it's special pert innocent now with the recent passage of the three bills last night, the trade bills with colombia, panama, and south korea. everyone's making such a big deal about, you know, how they got them through quickly and how bipartisan they were, and it's true, but this bill was also devicive, and it was not just three countries bob was negotiating with, but 102. this was one of the really large rounds of trade, and so i wanted to read a little bit about how bob negotiated through congress. at the part in the -- the bill end up passing 305 #-7 # # in the house and 90-4 in the senate, and after the house vote came in, bob said to stu, a domestic policy adviser. stu, who are the seven sons of bitches who voted against my bill? [laughter] he got the victory. there was a controversial bill, a devicive bill, and he still got the 395-7 vote and 90-4 vote. at this point,
about the commerce clause and equal protection to process, the first amendment to read it all the same debate and it's an appropriate debate and it's one that i wish we would reach the same high level but we saw in philadelphia and at other points in the ratification process, who we see in the federalist today. who sits at home and troughs the arguments that you see, letters? you have a staff of drafting these things. these are people that are engaged. you knew the constitution. these are not scholars. these were not people that appropriated to themselves to interpret what to talk about. these performers, these are business people. some of them had formal education and some did not but they cared about this country. i go back to your book can't you talk about the written and unwritten constitution. it's really what we do. it's the sort of trying to bring to apply the evin send problems and cases and develop them and that debate continues on each one of those, and that's why. that's why the arguments are. that's why the scholarship is. one thing i like about the tone of your book is its
, if you're not aware of what their authorities are, they're responsible for protecting us and our e-commerce and all things that go along with e-commerce and so if your company, if linkedin, yahoo!, pick the breach, had a data policy that they were this protecting these things and most of these fall under the laws of the states currently of the data breach acts of 47 of the u.s. states and territories, then they have to protect it. and so the ftc recently prosecuted windham hotels for the breach that they had for losing your credit cards and your identitis. google just settled a lawsuit with the ftc, and many others. so ftc is coming and starting to use their authorities to protect e-commerce and us and our privacy, our data and, that, so that lever exists. if they, i think you're going to start to see industry change the way that they're going about handling our data in the future. >> do you think there's a place for private right of action, i mean, or ftc enough? >> there are class-action suits. the most recent breach, i think e harm any, there is a -- eharmony, there is class-action suit
, information, in what direction and it continues. it is this same debate. you can talk about the commerce clause and equal protection of due process. it is all the same debate and it is an appropriate debate and hit is one that i would wish would sort of try to reach the same high-level that we saw in philadelphia that we are going to see at other points in the ratification process. sort of defense and arguments. who sits at home and drafts arguments that you see letters? you don't have a staff do these things. these are people who were engaged and also -- these were not scholars. these were not people who appropriated to themselves licenses to interpret or talk about this. these were foreigners. some of them who had formal education and some did not but they cared about this country. i think that i go back to your point. you talk about the written and the unwritten constitution. the unwritten constitution is sort of trying to to bring current events and problems and development and that debate continues on each one of them and that is why you see different points. that is why arguments -
for transportation, for commerce, they recognize a fundamental part of what it is to live in america in the 21st century. they want to get to the bottom of it. many of the aerospace companies, they not only make the airplanes, but the spacious. and so we have aero people and space people on the commission. i was counted as one of the space people. one of the trips we took was around the world. this is 2002. around the world to key places that have burgeoning aerospace industries to find out there is some competition that were not living up to -- were they doing we are not doing it, i went to beijing in 2002. my first time there, i went there with a complete portfolio stereotype about what i would expect. boulevards and bicycles. all right? this is what i expected. arriving in beijing, yeah, there are bicycles, but that's not what is filling the boulevard. there are mercedes and volkswagen's and bmws. it's not like anything i had ever seen. heads of agency there. i look carefully and i see on their hand, college rings, graduate degrees from american universities and engineering. almost every one
's about speaker thomas birkett read in the contentious 51st commerce. if you got a chance uribe camille enjoyed meeting the author. if you have that, come anyway and listen to him talk about the book in its research and doing a and maybe get some pointers. at an outcome would probably have some budding authors in our audience either here or on c-span. let me just briefly introduce today a soft authors so we can get into the program. i would mention that there is an article by our speaker, guy gugliotta in our current edition of our capital film magazines, copies of it in the back. please pick one up on your way out. it's also available online in and interact diversion at the historical society's website, and www..u.s. chs.org. our speaker today is guy gugliotta. after commanding a swift boat in south vietnam he became a journalist who has covered latin america, served 16 years as a national reporter for the "washington post" and has written extensively on science and policy issues for a variety of publications including "the new york times," "national geographic," wired, discover and th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)